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COB-MS Trial

Despite the high prevalence of cognitive difficulties seen in multiple sclerosis, there is a lack of developed programmes that target cognition, while also supporting people by helping them to function well in everyday life.

The Cognitive Occupation-Based programme for people with MS (COB-MS) was developed as a holistic, individualised cognitive rehabilitation intervention. It addresses the wide-ranging symptoms and functional difficulties that present in MS.

We are currently testing the COB-MS through a feasibility trial funded by the Health Research Board- (DIFA-FA-2018-027)

ISRCTN: ISRCTN11462710  

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National Survey of cognitive care in Multiple Sclerosis

The COB-MS team, in conjunction with our collaborators, want to understand how cognition and mood are currently assessed and treated in Ireland. 

We invited healthcare professionals in Ireland working with people with MS to complete a short National Survey to understand the current clinical management of cognition in the context of MS. We are in the process of analysing the results. Thanks to all who took part. 

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NIPS

Needs of people with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (NIPS) – a cross-cultural study.

I am co-investigator on the Irish part of this RIMS-funded European study focused on identifying the needs of people living with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Data will be collected with support from final year occupational therapy student. 

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Dating with a Diagnosis

This research, conducted in collaboration with Jackie Fox, Kinza Tabassum, and Sara Fuller, explored the lived experience of dating with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. 

This project was supported by a HRB summer studentship 2020 (KT). 

The findings of this research have been published and the link is on the "publications" section of this website.  

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Coming Soon

Details on other MS research